Review: Vampirella #1

Today is the day Vampirella fans have been waiting for – the release day for Vampirella #1 by Christopher Priest with art by Ergun Gunduz and letters by Willie Schubert. We’ve speculated, read interviews, and expressed desires and concerns about the series, but now it’s here so let’s talk about it!

My feeling after reading this first issue was one of excitement for the issues ahead. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It has a totally different feel than any other Vampirella book that I’ve read. I really don’t know what to expect going forward but I’m dying to find out what will happen next.

I really enjoyed the art of Ergun Gunduz. I wasn’t familiar with his work before this series. It gives the book a unique look that’s unlike most every Vampirella book of the past. This is a good compliment to the story which seems to be going down a unique path as well. The best and most important thing Gunduz does in this book is establish the correct look for Vampirella. It always annoys me greatly when I don’t feel like an artist truly captures the appearance of Vampi or any major character. Not a problem here.

Priest has laid down several plot points in this issue, but no real clues about where they will lead or how they will tie together. The primary focus was a therapy session between Vampirella and Dr. Chary as she recounts a plane crash that she survived. The doctor expresses strong skepticism about Vampirella’s claim of being an alien vampire from another planet, but she seems unfazed by his disbelief. The story also very briefly introduces us to several other characters who I’m sure we’ll get to know a bit in future installments. Everything works together to draw you in which is exactly what a first issue should do.

I really enjoyed the art of Ergun Gunduz. I wasn’t familiar with his work before this series. It gives the book a unique look that’s unlike most every Vampirella book of the past. This is a good compliment to the story which seems to be going down a unique path as well. The best and most important thing Gunduz does in this book is establish the correct look for Vampirella. It always annoys me greatly when I don’t feel like an artist truly captures the appearance of Vampi or any major character. Not a problem here.

So I’m personally very pleased with this start. Where it will go from here, I have no idea, but there is a lot of potential here for an intriguing and exciting series that’s fresh and new but still stays true to the character. As always, I’d love to know what everyone thought about the issue – all opinions welcome!

6 Comments

  1. I really liked everything about this book except for the comment on how the Drakulonian language sounds like a yodel and a wet fart. Other than that, everything else had me intrigued.

    I have to say though, re-reading issue 0, it’s made apparent that Vampirella doesn’t believe in God. Although, didn’t she see God crush her mother Lilith with his thumb at one point? Or am I imagining that?

    • Hi Nexus. You’re right, that is a little inconsistent if we’re still going with the whole Lilith narrative, which I guess we are. Priest said in interviews that he didn’t believe in retconning. The blurb about the next issue said “Mommy Dearest and the Many Origins of Vampirella,” so maybe it will offer some clarity.

  2. Not a comment to do with this Issue, but one rather I received the same day, the Vampirella #1 warren Reprint , did you snag a copy of that? If so, did you notice how the spine of the cover was printed with “Wear Marks” on it? I bought one of these before during Vampirella’s 40th Anniversary, I figured I’d get the 50th anniversary edition.. I actually have 2 copies of the 1969 issue as well, one of them I got Forrest Ackerman to sign for me in the late 1990’s! :)!

    • Yep, I got a copy of that too. I didn’t notice anything on the spine, I’ll have to go back and take a look. How does the cover of your copy compare to your original from 1969? To me, it looks like the print quality of the original is better. Frazetta’s artwork looks too dark and suffers from loss of detail on the reprint. Still nice to have a pristine copy – my original isn’t exactly high grade!

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